Child Drug Abuse Prevention Tips For Parents – 7 Ways to Help Promote Your Child’s Safety

Having an open caring relationship with an adult role model is a critical piece of preventing drug abuse in children.

Parents and primary care givers have a critical role in preventing children’s in involvement with drugs and alcohol. It is a virtual dead certainty that your child will come in contact with drugs and alcohol sooner rather than later. How they handle it can be largely determined by parental involvement and preparation. Please do not ignore this problem and hope it will simply go away. Here is why.

Some facts on child drug use. (Office of National Drug Control Policy)

o The single leading cause of death among youth is driving under the influence.

o The second leading cause is suicide. Drugs are present 60% of the time.

o The average age of first use of alcohol is 11 years old.

o Of children who use alcohol or drugs before age 15, 40% are later classified with an addiction.

No parent wants to see their child involved with drugs. The likelihood of a child associating with drug-using friends is reduced by a close relationship with their parents There are some specific steps you can take to help your child be properly prepared to meet the challenge of drugs and alcohol. Here they are:

1. Give clear messages and expectations that using drugs is not OK. Don’t assume your child knows your views, state them and make them clear as a bell.

2. Be a good, active listener. Be alert to both spoken and implied messages when you or your child is speaking about drugs. Have discussions not arguments.

3. Help with your child deal with peer pressure to use drugs. Review possible scenarios or listen to what has happened. Work out the possibilities both the pros and the cons of the situation as well as expected or potential outcomes. Help to plan appropriate actions and empower your child to act.

4. Get familiar with your child’s friends and parents. Meeting your children’s friends will give you a sense of their personalities, what they are “into”,” and their family situations. Don’t be too quick to judge a child’s friends, though. Radical styles and unconventional appearances may be nothing more than a badge of identity.

5. Know your child’s whereabouts. Children who had the least amount of monitoring or ‘latchkey’ kids are at greater risk of drug use and at earlier ages. Check up on your child’s whereabouts.

6. Supervise activities. Unsupervised parties or activities are an open invitation to drug use.

7. Have open, honest and sincere conversations with your child about using drugs and alcohol and the consequences.

These tips are just the tip of the iceberg on proactive steps you can take as parents in protecting and preparing your child for exposure to drugs and alcohol use. More information and resources are freely available.

Safe Use of Medicines Is Important in Drug Abuse Prevention

Many cases of drug addiction started from mere curiosity. An error in the use of a prescription drug, for example, could have led to experimentation. In a typical case, the person probably enjoyed the euphoria he experienced when he first took the drug, and this made him use the drug repeatedly.

This is the same reason why parents have to be extra careful about the drugs they keep in their medicine chests. A young child may be tempted to try what a bottle in the chest contains, adding to the many cases described above.

Time and again, it’s been said that prevention is better than cure, and this applies to drug addiction: It is a lot better to prevent the problem from happening than to deal with it when it does occur. There are many ways by which drug abuse prevention is applied best, and one of these is in using drugs safely.

If a list of safe drug use is to be made in this regard, it will most probably be topped by this: A person should not take doses of drugs beyond what have been prescribed by his doctor. In addition to this, he should follow the instructions indicated on the medicine label to a tee.

Unused portions of medicines should not be saved for future use, unless this has been consulted to a doctor. Also, drugs that have been prescribed to you must not be shared with anyone else just because you think you have the same case of illness. There could be serious consequences – drug addiction included – if a person takes medicines or drugs that are not intended for him.

If a person feels he is ill and decides to see a doctor, he should provide enough information to the doctor about what he feels is wrong with him. This is important so that the doctor can prescribe the appropriate medication and treat him effectively. The person also has to make sure that the doctor knows all the drugs he uses regularly, whether these are nonprescription or prescription medications. This is to avoid the risk of drug interactions or over-dosage.

A person should keep a record of any bad reaction he has had to a drug prescribed to him. Such reaction may include getting into an intense state of euphoria. The person may mistake the condition for well-being, and here lies the potential for addiction or abuse as the person craves for more of the drug.

Drug Abuse Prevention – Before and After Hiring Employees

Dealing with employees who abuse drugs is very costly and frustrating. If only you could slow down the abuse, let alone stop it, you’d feel more in charge, knowing you are doing the right thing: The right thing for your company or other organization, not to mention the right thing for the good of society.

There are ways to screen potential employees in the original job interview as well give support to existing employees when it comes to minimizing drug abuse.

There is much you can do, especially if you are in charge of Human Relations, and at a low cost, too. It all centers upon EDUCATION. For every one of us to slow down the use of illegal drugs, we must all take ownership of the growing problem of drug addictions and abuse. We must, each of us, confront the problem in our own way. We can no longer fool ourselves into thinking that “it’s not my problem. It’s the problem of the schools, the police, the medical emergency community.”

Wrong. It’s our problem and those of you who work with employee hiring and support are in an excellent position to effectively control the presence of illegal drugs in your office, factory, or other business organization.

You already know how costly the problems of drug abuse and addictions are to your firm. You are stressed because employees don’t show up for work or are late Or how they are not focused on their duties and so cause dangerous accidents while operating machinery or vehicles. Then, too, there’s the limited ability to think creatively to make production goals easier to achieve, because their brains cannot process data as swiftly as they should.

But you can tighten up the new-hire process and continued employee support by offering your employees and potential employees some basic facts about illegal street drugs. And the tool you can easily use are several easily-understood booklets that lay out the facts of how street drugs destroy the minds and bodies of users.The booklets show in simply understood text, drawings, and photographs how drug residues stay in the fatty tissues of the body. And, if untreated, that drug residue stays in there for a lifetime.

The printed booklets also punch holes in such myths as “a little marijuana won’t hurt you.” The truth is that it will hurt both the mind and the body of the user because it drains the body of vitamins and minerals that it needs and also affects the nervous system, causing negative changes and even numbness. The fact is that marijuana smoke contains 400 chemicals and that 60 of these cause cancer.

But the booklets are not confined to pot-smoking alone. They deal with such drugs as ecstasy, cocaine, heroin, meth, and also alcohol. Ecstasy, for example, increases body temperatures to dangerous levels that can stop a beating heart. Additionally, it damages brain cells and so limits memory.

Of course, in all of this, there are extreme mood swings that bring about family violence, lack of motivation, depression of learning abilities, poverty, crime, and even jail-time. The entire scene is, indeed, sad.

The booklets also help set up role-model situations in which the readers can practice what to say when a drug-pusher comes along with his or her false messages. The readers can answer, “No thanks. I don’t want any part of them,” and say it with conviction and confidence.

As readers are steeped in the true facts of drug abuse, they become more armed then ever to ward off the enticing messages of those who are bent in spreading their falsities.

Perhaps you are in a business that tends to attract persons with backgrounds that include drug use and so you live with this situation every day. It behooves you to offer some leadership to assist people to overcome their problems, because a healthier workforce is a more productive workforce. And that leads to a smoother running company and more bottom line profits.

Drug Abuse Prevention – A Simple Approach For Parents

It’s sometimes a tough thing for you as a parent to confront, not being in control of what happens to your child.

But there are things you can do to have more influence. The basic fact is that the more a person knows about something, the more responsibility he can take for it and the more he can control it.

I want to emphasize straightaway here that the philosophy behind this article is all about applying simplicity to the subject. It’s about basics. The world can be such a complex place but the truth is simple – and the truth about drugs is simple. So it is possible to get it across to someone easily.

It may be a cliché but knowledge IS power and the knowledge which you have and then share with your young person can give you that control which you desire.

Now this is not control in a bad way. Let’s face it, a lot of us don’t like to be controlled and most certainly teenagers don’t generally like to be controlled. But being in control so that your teenager does not get into trouble is positive control and it just has to be exerted in such a way that it is not forceful, not make-wrong and hopefully not even obvious.

A survey done by the BBC in Britain a few years ago highlighted the fact that parents are still largely the number one role models in young people’s lives, not some pop singer or sports star. So here’s another thing for you to confront as a parent – your own behaviour, habits and attitudes concerning drugs and alcohol – because they are noticed.

This whole experience of ensuring a safe and happy start in life for your young person starts therefore with you. Just let me reassure you – the more you know and understand the subject of drugs, the easier it gets to deal with it.

Ask any person in his twenties who got into problems with drugs and he will go back to the first experience in his teenage years and tell you that things would have been different if he’d had some real knowledge about them.

Education does start in the home and if a young person is not getting the right knowledge at school or from his friends, then he definitely needs to get it at home. In a world full of misleading and false information about drugs and alcohol, a young person needs stable data to dispel the confusion that inevitably can occur. Just one stable datum can bring certainty where uncertainty existed before – and this reduces the vulnerability of young people in the face of peer pressure.

So help your young person to be more in control. Educate them on what drugs are and how they affect the body and the mind. With more certainty on a subject, young people will be more confident in their decisions. But give them the power of choice. Give them the responsibility. Of course there can be a lot of peer pressure to use alcohol and drugs, but ultimately it is their decision. Rarely is a person pinned down and forced to drink alcohol or take a puff of a joint.

Don’t preach and don’t force your opinions on them. Be honest in answering their questions. Treat them as intelligent, responsible individuals and you can get intelligent, responsible behaviour in return. That might sound like a leap into the unknown for you but just think back to when you were their age – how would you have wanted to be treated?

The author is a part-time lecturer in the field of drug prevention. He gave his first lectures in 1993 and averages about 10,000 young people a year. This he does around his work in the wellness sector where he works mainly with water, algae and salt. He puts a lot of emphasis on the power of simplicity.

Drug Abuse Prevention, Communications & Information – The Keys to Helping Your Kids &Your Friends

You can prevent someone near you from getting hooked on drugs or stopping an addiction with not a lot of effort and talent. Start with honing your communication skills. Decide to get into a conversation about the dire effects upon the mind and body with the person you love or know has a problem.

But how to do it?

First, consider what NOT to do: Do not overload him or her with too many statistics or with a preacher-like lecture. There is an old saying that “A mind that ‘s changed against its will is of the same opinion still.” There’s a lot of truth in that bit of wisdom. Rather start any conversation establishing agreement (on any subject). Establish agreement so that the person feels comfortable with you in the conversation rather than being on the defensive because of the overload of information being shoved at him or her in a too-long lecture. A lecture is not a real communication.

A real communication is a two-way street in which information is both sent out, received with understanding, and then completed with an answer that deals with the subject at hand.

Also, any real communication is done by keeping a “low gradient” on the subject. In other words, start with a subject, such as the weather, sports, or another area of common interest in which agreement can be sought easily with no disagreement whatsoever. Instead of hammering a person with a ton of statistics about how bad drugs are, how much drug abuse is associated with crime, violence, unhappiness, etc., etc., etc., statistic, statistic, statistic, just keep the message easy to understand and with a minimum of emotion. You will know when you are successful at communicating when the two-way conversation is comfortable between the two of you. With a youngster, that may take awhile and might take several conversations spread over days or weeks.

When your youngster or other friend is comfortable talking to you about the dangers of street-drug abuse, you wil find that you need reference materials that are easy to read and understand. They, in effect, are third party influences that do not come from “mom and dad.” Instead, the youngster is more willing to accept the “third party” authority of the booklets that you can give them. (After all, what do mom and dad or grandpa and grandma know about anything anyway?)

Also, know that your children looks up to you more than you realize, even though they would never admit it.

Concurrently, they also face peer pressure so intense that you have to do something positive to offset it. You can also use the booklets to role-play situations in which your child is confronted by an overbearing drug-pusher. When your child stops the pusher in his tracks with a resounding “no,” you will have succeeded even though you were never told what happened.

Want to learn more about parental drug prevention communication? Go to my website: [http://waragainstdrugs.org], and open it now.

There are two great booklets offered. One is titled, “10 Things Your Friends May Not Know About Drugs.” The other is “How to Talk to Children About Drugs.”

They’re inexpensive and easy to order.

Once you have them in your home, they can be your invaluable reference booklets that keep drug abuse out of your life.